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Animal Farm and The Power and the Glory

29 Nov 2017

In Animal Farm, George Orwell satirized the betrayal of Russia's revolution by its leaders. We see how the whole concept of equality was flawed, especially as it translated into actual reality and practise. What made it even more fascinating was that it was an animal story that was told to adults. In other words, in the simplest language, Orwell showed how and why communism simply could not work. Graham Greene, meanwhile, was also very serious in Power and the Glory -- as well as theological. Here we see the story of a whisky priest who is hunted by Communist authorities during the religious persecution in Mexico. In other words, both Orwell and Greene focus on the reality of totalitarianism, and especially how such totalitarianism is carried through in the interest of supposed utopian ideas. In both stories, there are two villains, Napoleon and the lieutenant, both of whom represent the corruption of power.

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Orwell and the Power of Everyday Resistance

29 Nov 2017

George Orwell is today best remembered as a writer of novels that warned against the evils of totalitarianism in strong – almost strident – terms. His shorter works are far less widely read now and, in an age that tends to dismiss the value of the essay and even more of the short story as an important political form, tend to be dismissed as worthy of careful scrutiny. But Orwell’s essays provide an excellent vantage point to understand his political philosophy both in general and as it is elucidated in his novels. They also provide us as readers with a wry but finely thought-out series of sketches on the nature of resistance, as Carter (1985) argues.

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Why George Orwell’s 1984 Remains Relevant

29 Nov 2017

First published in 1949, George Orwell’s 1984 continues to function as a blueprint for ideological evil. The monstrousness of Stalinism and Nazism, which in Orwell’s day were very active political disasters, fuelled the author’s insights. Since World War II, the terrors of spastic ideology and hyper-violent complacency occur in many effective dystopian novels (such as Burgess’ seminal A Clockwork Orange)but what sets 1984 above Burgess’ book is its comprehensive understanding of the moral failure implicit in any totalitarian state; from the intimate nature of Winston Smith’s brainwashing in Room 101, to his interrogator’s demands for a belief that suits Big Brother, the reader gets a full understanding of how tyrants shape the thinking of a populace through Doublethink.

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Orwell's Concepts of Big Brother and Doublethink

29 Nov 2017

In "1984" George Orwell described a concept he called Big Brother. He also discussed concepts such as Newspeak and Doublethink. These concepts are in regular everyday use in certain countries, and Big Brother is very much in evidence in North America. What Orwell was describing was the future as a totalitarian society. What he discusses is not at all an impossibility even for the democratic countries of the West. All that is required for a totalitarian regime to arise is an ideology. What Orwell is writing about is mainly Communist countries. However, there are some striking similarities between the Oceania of the novel and countries such as Canada and the United States.

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Scope of Depression in the Human Brain

28 Nov 2017

This paper will discuss the nature of biology in the scope of depression in the human brain. By researching how this type of chemical process is illuminated in the idea of clinical depression, we can learn much about this affects the psychological perspectives involved. With all of these aspects to create a more conducive argument for depression, we can learn that much of the elements of depression can be seen in this type of scientific format. In this paper, a series of different ways that biology can be associated with psychological reactions will be covered to prove this point.

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The Making of American Audiences

28 Nov 2017

The Making of American Audiences: From Stage to Television 1750-1990 by Richard Butsch is a comprehensive survey of American entertainment audiences from the colonial period to the present. It provides coverage of the theatre, opera, vaudeville minstrelsy, movies, radio and television. (Butsch 2000)

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The Individual and Impersonal Historical Forces

27 Nov 2017

This paper examines the romantic movement of the nineteenth century, as opposed to communism, as the key alternative to capitalism. Communism and capitalism both asserted the primacy of economics and of impersonal historical forces. Alternately, the Romantics advocated the primacy of subjective, personal, emotional experiences.

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The Arrival of Islam in India and Its Impact

27 Nov 2017

Arab merchants were active in India before the birth of the prophet Muhammad and Islam. It is less than five hundred nautical miles from the Arabian Peninsula to the mouth of the Indus River and the trip can be completed without leaving sight of land. Thus in the first century after the death of Muhammad, Islam first entered India with these traders.

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Art in the movie Six Degrees of Separation

24 Nov 2017

This paper will discuss the role of art in the Six Degrees of Separation that is presented in the film. By analyzing such works as the Kandinski painting, that appears in the movie, as well as the New York art scene projected in the movie, we can see how it a n integral part of the movie. By analyzing the art of this movie, we can see how the role of this format plays into the theme within it.

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Chinese Cinema: An Analysis

24 Nov 2017

Rewriting history and censoring critics have been inherent aspects of Chinese Communism. Over the last fifty years of communist rule, China has been a diverse nation struggling to achieve philosophical and political uniformity, as well as radical modernization, and the leadership has been determined to achieve their ideological goals by whatever means necessary.

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Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance

24 Nov 2017

Abstract: This essay discusses how the film Kanehsatake deals with the European conquest of North America and its legacy. We see the themes of resistance and activism, as the documentary shows us the stand-off at OKA. The essay then ties in the notion of oppression of in our society of other groups.

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Araby: in a Boy’s Dream

23 Nov 2017

I'll sing thee songs of Araby, And takes of fair Cashmere, Wild tales to cheat thee of a sign, Or charm thee to a tear. And dreams of delight shall on thee break, And rainbow visions rise, And my soul shall strive to wake Sweet wonder in thine eyes ...... *(words by W.G. Wills; music by Frederick Clay)

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“A Painful Case” and the Role of Selfishness

23 Nov 2017

This paper shall explore the short story, “A Painful Case” by the author James Joyce. This paper shall address how Mr James Duffy as an individual who condemned himself to a life of misery due to his selfish qualities. In “A Painful Case”, Duffy is cast as an individual who is absurdly taken with his own thoughts and his own solitude, and this perspective does not waver through the course of the short story despite the questioning that Duffy takes on his personal nature towards the conclusion of the tale.

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Tragic Loss of Potential in Hamlet

23 Nov 2017

According to Aristotle, one of the elements of tragedy is the pain of watching potential greatness denied. Tragic figures from classical drama through Renaissance drama signify not just individual loss but communal injury, as a character raised to immense height by the gods (or God) falls publicly. Such is the situation for three very different examples of Shakespeare’s tragic protagonists, young Prince Hamlet, old King Lear, and ambitious King Richard III. Though these characters bear little resemblance to each other aside from their noble blood, all their deaths evoke a sense of communal loss, a recognition of what might have been, and their respective tragedies are all, in a sense, tragedies of denied potential.

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A Compare and Contrast of Ophelia and Portia

23 Nov 2017

This paper will compare the two characters Portia in the Merchant of Venice and Ophelia of Hamlet in William Shakespeare’s plays. By understanding how these two women are similar, we can see the ideas of Shakespeare setting trends in the way they think, and how they behave in the larger scope of feminine characterization. By understanding this, the major emphasis of both characters can give a broader scope of their meaning in the text.

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Multiplicity of Meaning in the Last Moments of Hamlet

23 Nov 2017

Most Hamlet scholarship focuses on the body of the play, or on the monologues, or on the historical context of Shakespeare’s writing. The article that I have analyzed below, however, is a formalist criticism of the last scene of the play, and the avenues of interpretation that Shakespeare intentionally left open in order to give the play and its characters more depth. The theme of secrecy in the play, which is also seen in the plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries, is a major factor in the multiple meanings that can be attributed to the last scene. In Hamlet, Shakespeare created a character with a substantial inner life, which Brown acknowledges by quoting a number of Hamlet’s references to the depth of his own sadness (Brown, 17). Reading this article gave me a new perspective on a play I had thought to be relatively unproblematic compared to contemporary drama. In clarifying the meanings of the last moments of Hamlet, Brown actually muddies the waters, creating new possibilities for directors and scholars alike.

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Villette

22 Nov 2017

Chapter six marks the beginning of an internal change for the narrator. She has awakened in this chapter. She has for the first time learned who she is and is beginning to accept the possibility that she didn’t know herself at all.

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Jane Eyre: Love and Longing in Europe

22 Nov 2017

At the time of its first publication in 1849, Charlotte Bronte’s masterwork Jane Eyre was considered one of the most rebellious pieces of literature ever written. Never before had a woman published a work of fiction describing an ill-fated love affair that was so melodramatic that the reviewers called it scandalous and unholy. The Quarterly Review, a London periodical, said of Jane Erye that:

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Jane Eyre: Cultivating The Feminine as Feminist

22 Nov 2017

Abstract: This essay reads Jane Eyre with attention to the symbols of Nature, and the natural relations that Jane assumes within the natural world. Bronte offers the moon as a feminine symbol in the story, one that reappears as a source of light and inspiration for Jane, thus presenting the moon as a feminine Ideal. With this symbolic representation of nature in gendered terms, Bronte provides a feminist novel, where the prominent feature of Jane’s character is her independence and personal will, and is symbolized in a feminine ideal of Nature.

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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: An Analysis

22 Nov 2017

First published in book form in 1916, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is essentially a revealing autobiographical novel covering the first two decades of author James Joyce’s life, and deals with his struggle for intellectual freedom and his eventual awakening to the desire to become a great artist. Joyce writes in the third person as Stephen Daedalus, the oldest child in a large Irish family with a father who is prosperous but rather unfocused at making a living.

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Is Artificial Intelligence a Proper Goal For Human Endeavour?

21 Nov 2017

This essay will argue that artificial intelligence is a proper goal for human endeavour but that, at the same time, it poses tremendous risks for humanity at large. Humans, therefore, have to remain extremely cautious at the amount of power and control that they give to computer science. The danger is the possibility that artificial intelligence may ultimately acquire a mind of its own.

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Reductionism as a Key to the Unification of Science

21 Nov 2017

Robert Klee, in his Introduction to the Philosophy of Science - a review of recent developments and controversies in the philosophy of science - argues that "reductionism" is central to the future development of the sciences. The plural "sciences" is employed here to signify how important reductionism is to the unification of the sciences. Indeed, without the possibility of reduction, there could be no unity of the sciences.

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A History of Abnormal Psychology

21 Nov 2017

The history of psychic and physical suffering is a history of humanity. From primitive society’s magical priest, medicine man, healer, or sorcerer, to the contemporary psychologist and psychiatrist, the life of the human-being is one that includes a history of trying to reduce the suffering of those who have been, and are, tormented. Today we can understand these as interactions of processes that are social and biological, neurological, psychic, emotional, and genetic.

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Frank Lloyd Wright – Broadacre City

20 Nov 2017

Wright sought an architecture that responded to nature and human needs. His focus was on harmonizing environment, structure, objects, outfittings, and inhabitants. Wright's design for Broadacre City, like his Usonian houses, first emerged during the 1930s. The Swiss-born Le Corbusier had proposed a "Ville Radieuse" in a 1932 article in the New York Times Magazine. Le Corbusier' s plan was a cluster of high-rises in the midst of large grassy areas.

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Fillippo Brunelleschi: Engineer and Architect

20 Nov 2017

Florence began its rise to pre-eminence in the thirteenth century. Its banks provided the credit and financial infrastructure for the emerging mercantile system and the Florentine currency; the florin became the international currency of commerce. Giotto began the artistic experimentation that was to make him the first of many Florentine artists to achieve international fame. Also, Dante's Inferno, a classic account of man's search for redemption, was first published during this period. 

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