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Political Speech Essay

20 Nov 2017

SUMMARY: This paper examines the idea of Political Speech within the context of the constitution and our national political discourse. “Aristotle does not limit the content of political speech to rational truth claims. Deliberative oratory is the rhetorical genre that Cicero designates for political speech. While some societies or political organizations absolutely restrict the ability of the populous to discuss things political, demonstrating a fear that political speech may lead to rebellion. Kennedy's argument that regulation forces political speech underground (Rosen, 2000). It depresses political speech, it oppresses political association, and it discriminates in favor of incumbents, the wealthy and the well-known. Political speech is protected, absolutely.

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The Coca Cola Company: Its Future Prospects

20 Nov 2017

Coca Cola is the most recognizable brand name in the world. Not surprisingly, the Coca Cola company is also the largest beverage company in the world. In its opinion, and in that of most consumers, Coca Cola products are simply superior to those of their competitors. The company’s express objective has been to create value for its shareholders through a long-term commitment to its customers in terms of quality, satisfaction, and innovation. Looking to the company’s incredible success, it is clear that it has done this with a fervor. In the information provided on the company’s webpage it is stated that:

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Book Review: The Prince by Machiavelli

17 Nov 2017

Abstract: This essay considers the contradictory interpretations of Machiavelli’s (1532) The Prince. While it is commonly read as a treatise on political science, it is also regarded as a “handbook” for tyranny. The foundation of these conflicts is in the distinctions Machiavelli draws between political leadership and morality. This essay reviews the Prince with particular interest in the differences between politics and morality, and how these are relevant to issues of leadership in current political contexts.

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The Influence of African American Musicians on Racial Barriers

17 Nov 2017

SUMMARY: It is the purpose of this paper to examine how the efforts of early black rock musicians led to the breaking down of racial barriers and to the overall success of the black music industry. The Rock Music industry introduced African Americans to the boardrooms of major American companies. The fact is that African Americans make up a significant portion of the business culture in American popular music, past and present. Artists like Chuck Berry, Chubby Checker, B.B. King, and Little Richard, have all brought significant influences into the American Music scene.

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Coincidence and Fate in the works of Bronte and Dickens

16 Nov 2017

Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights are both novels in which can be found the elements of coincidence and fate. The Oxford English Dictionary defines coincidence as "a notable concurrence of events having no apparent causal connection."1 Indeed, this idea is highly important in Dickens' intricate plot which is, in fact, brought together through the power of coincidence. Similarly, in Bronte's novel, coincidence plays a role in the development of the plot. Often, however, one is not able to clearly label a series of connected occurrences as coincidence. Rather, at times it seems probable that the notion of fate is operating in both Dickens' and Bronte's works. Once again, The Oxford English Dictionary serves as a source of gaining a clear sense of what is fate. It defines this concept as "the principle, power, or agency by which, according to certain philosophical and popular systems of belief some events are unalterably predetermined."2 Although neither Dickens nor Bronte ever clearly state what elements in their novels are controlled by fate, it is possible using this definition, to analyze the works in the attempt to discover whether or not fate is in fact operative.

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Hard Times and the Bluest Eye

16 Nov 2017

The Bluest Eye has been written by Toni Morrison that is based on Claudia Mac Teer’s perspective, who is a nine-year-old child. Claudia and her sister Frieda tell the story of the Breedlove family who has recently moved from the rural south to urban Lorain, Ohio. Morrison builds story with the help of Claudia’s point of view i.e. how she perceives the displacement of the family and how it contributes to the dysfunctional family’s decline. Of course this is coupled with the fact that the Breedlove is extremely poor and are subjected to grinding working conditions in order to make a living for themselves. Claudia traces the descent of Pecola Breedlove into madness with the help of flashbacks and temporal shifts. On the other hand, Charles Dickens Hard Times is the archetypal Dickens novel according to some sources that encompasses family problems, estrangement, rotten values and unhappiness. The book is about Thomas Gradgrind who is obsessed with misguided utilitarian values which makes him rely on facts and statistics instead of emotions. Not only this but he also enforces his own belief upon his family thereby leading to their decline particularly that of her daughter Louisa.

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The Poverty of Rationalism, Scientific and Material

16 Nov 2017

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) in his portrayal of the scientist Aylmer in “The Birthmark” resembles Charles Dickens (1812-1870) in his depiction of the male role in A Christmas Carol in the character of Scrooge. The reader is given examples of human personality that remain familiar and which continue to draw criticism. When Hawthorne and Dickens are examined as Victorian authors, we see that their views of gender correspond to ideas and ideals belonging to another age, shaped by the social environment in which they wrote. More important, Hawthorne and Dickens present then radical criticism in response to the rise of Britain as a preeminent power in Europe and about the world; a Victorian society challenged by science and the rise of a broader English business culture via opportunities that had arrived through the later 18th century.

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Drawing Pure Fiction from Fact and Folklore

15 Nov 2017

William Shakespeare is often heralded as one of the greatest literary minds that has ever lived, but the majority of his stories draw their roots from some other creative source. Shakespeare appropriated themes from history, folklore, and mythology to compile his plays. However, despite the origin of the content of the play, it is beyond question that William Shakespeare was the true genius behind the works that he made popular. This paper shall discuss selected works by Shakespeare in order to demonstrate that while the content might not have been original, the genius behind the execution of the plays belongs to Shakespeare alone.

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Walt Whitman and Homosexuality

15 Nov 2017

Throughout Whitman's writings there are consistent references to his homosexuality. Leaves of Grass perhaps serves as the best indication of this reality, as Whitman made many analogies to his sexual orientation. Indeed, Whitman's poetry does appear to indicate that Whitman was a homosexual, and it is evident from his notebooks, his letters, and the patterns of his personal relationships as well. Poetry appears to have served as a metaphor for his sexual tendencies, and it offered indications of his sexual desire and conduct. In many respects, therefore, his writings were a species of sexually specific self-revelation. Leaves of Grass produced this revelation. (Whitman, Leaves of Grass)

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Hamlet: Themes and Structure

14 Nov 2017

Hamlet is characterized by the central theme of being and doing. “To be or not to be, that is the question”. The structure of the play evolves with all else wrapped around it. All the themes build the play into a well-rounded entity while running simultaneously. The structure of the play evolves out of the themes of disease and decay, appearance and reality, fortune and providence, and finally revenge and deliberation.

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BEOWULF: A New Verse Translation

14 Nov 2017

Abstract: The review explores the work of Seamus Heaney (1999) in translating the epic Anglo-Saxon document, “Beowulf.” This translation is compared to the digital restoration work being done with the original documents found in the British Library. Both Heaney and the Beowulf restoration group (at the University of Kentucky) are working with identical documents; however, Heamus has translated the text into a more accessible story, and restoration experts such as Keirnan (1984) have worked to preserve the original document for study. This essay evaluates whether Beowulf is a “story” or an artifact of Anglo-Saxon history, and the significance of the difference between translation and restoration.

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Fallacious Reasoning in Beowulf

14 Nov 2017

When having a discussion or debate where you are trying to be persuasive, there are two types of reasoning which can be employed, cogent reasoning and fallacious reasoning. Cogent reasoning should satisfy the following conditions: It should employ arguments where the premises of the arguments provide good grounding for the conclusion, the premises of the argument must be acceptable to all parties, and the premises must contain all of the relevant information, not just a portion of the relevant information. Fallacious reasoning, however, is reasoning that is simply not cogent. To compare to the above definition of cogent reasoning, fallacious reasoning does not provide sufficiently good grounds for its conclusion, employs unwarranted, unaccepted, unproven or incorrect premises, and ignores or overlooks relevant information.

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Beowulf – Past and Present Renditions of this Classic Work

14 Nov 2017

This paper shall examine the modern treatment of Beowulf by Dr David Breeden with the traditional interpretation of this classic legend. The elements of character development and the use of plot and conflict shall be compared and contrasted between these two separate works. The text of Breeden’s work was chosen due to its presentation as a dual- language edition of the legend.

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Book Review: Confessions of a Mask by Yukio Mishima

13 Nov 2017

The long quotation from Dostoevsky that Yukio Mishima uses as the epigraph for Confessions of a Mask is appropriate in two ways. It is appropriate for what it actually says—the notion of two diametrically opposed ideals burning with equal fervour in a man’s heart. It is also appropriate because Dostoevsky was one of the first writers to portray a person who is crippled by his thoughts, unable to move for the mind-forg’d manacles that he himself has shackled himself in. The narrator of Dostoevsky’s Notes From Underground, for example, is a good specimen: totally immobilised by the circular and self-deceptive melancholy that infects his brain.

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Good and Evil in Wuthering Heights

10 Nov 2017

Emily Bronte published Wuthering Heights in 1847, at the tender age of twenty-eight. Few novels of any era have taken hold of the public’s imagination with such a firm grasp. Even those who have never read the book are probably familiar with the idea, if not the character, of Heathcliff. The novel has been transformed into musicals, films and even a hit song for the then sixteen year old British songstress, Kate Bush. Nothing, however, compares to the book. Whether we can separate the authoress from her accomplishment is debatable. The fact is, given Emily’s young age, her relatively sheltered upbringing, and the times in which she wrote, the novel is astonishing quite apart from its significant literary merit. That it is a romance--albeit of the highest order--is obvious. The novel is also, however, an examination of Heaven, Hell, the Fall, questions of origin and the nature of good and evil. Religious references abound--not surprising for the daughter of a clergyman--but her world view is far from the simplistic one of traditional Christianity. Good and evil, as are heaven and hell, seem inextricably intertwined in this wild setting. Rather than being two opposing forces, each resides in us. The real evil is committed when we go against our true selves, as Heathcliff and Catherine do. This may be seen, perhaps, most clearly in Bronte’s depiction of place, and in the characters of the two lovers, Catherine and Heathcliff.

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Panic and Emptiness in Howard’s End

10 Nov 2017

Lionell Trilling’s remark that one of the major themes in E.M. Forester’s book is that of panic and emptiness is not lost on filmmakers Merchant and Ivory. The following study will examine exactly how this theme is conveyed in their adaptation of Howard’s End, paying close attention to elements of story structure, characterization, revealing images, and general cinematic technique.

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Milton's Paradise Lost - Book 1: Satan

10 Nov 2017

In Book 1 of Milton's "Paradise Lost," Milton re-tells the story of Creation, and highlights the story of Satan, cast from Heaven for wanting to be equal in power with the "Almighty Spirit." What is interesting about Milton's characterization involves the many "human" traits which he ascribes the Satan.

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The Male Character in Restoration Drama

10 Nov 2017

The modern concept of the “nerd” is not such a new phenomena, for classic British literature defines and describes this type of individual as being an outcast in a world dominated by heroes. The period of Restoration Drama, for example, contains frequent references to such characters, as well as the roles played by more dominant and extroverted men and women. Through investigating the roles played by both men and women, the reader can perceive that such conceptions of the strong and popular male who achieves his goals and gains the attentions of the women has always been sharply contrasted against the figure of the unsophisticated “country bumpkin.”

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Pride and Prejudice

10 Nov 2017

An analysis of the six relationships/marriages in the novel entails a discussion of priorities in courtship and marriage. Through her characters and relationships, Austin shows the complexity that brings people together, and how the wrong reasons for union can lead to marital emptiness.

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The Role of Sports Development Officers

09 Nov 2017

Entering the new millenium young people of today are exposed to computer technology, the web, television, and numerous distractions that are preferred to the traditional entertainment of Sports. [2] Not only is there a reduction in enthusiasm for sports there is also a proportionate decrease in opportunities in the form of playgrounds, sports centers, gyms, coaches and competitions available to the masses. Recognizing this dilemma and foreseeing its negative impact on health and society, many private and government organizations have stepped forward to promote sports in general and specifically at all levels and in a variety of aspects.

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Borderline Personality Disorder in the Field of Psychology

08 Nov 2017

This paper will discuss the psychological illness Borderline Personality Disorder, and seek to understand its many facets. By understanding its symptoms, the definition of this malady can be made clear in a psychological format. Also, the study of what is being done to help this illness will be sought after in the treatments available for it. In realizing all of these objectives, this paper will collect a comprehensive analysis of this illness.

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Douglas, Whitman and their Narratives

08 Nov 2017

Frederick Douglass's account of his life in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass epitomized many of the contradictions in American history and society. In many respects, it could be compared to the contradictions and opposites that Walt Whitman revealed about life in his poem "Song of Myself."

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Maimonides vs. Aristotle Regarding Preventative Medicine

07 Nov 2017

Aristotle's view on preventive medicine is evident in his Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle argues that bodily strength and health are dependent on the actions of the individual. Strength is derived from doing the most appropriate level of exercise, while health is dependent on the right quantity of food and drink. Clearly, physical strength, well-being and good health are dependent on the decisions made by individuals in this regard. Aristotle places the emphasis on prevention rather than curing disease or illhealth. This is evident in the following passage from Nicomachean Ethics.

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The Representation of Corruption

07 Nov 2017

The time is out of joint. O cursed spite That ever I was born to set it right! (Hamlet I.v. 189-90)

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Virgil’s Aeneid and Dante’s Inferno: An Analysis

07 Nov 2017

 In order to understand how Virgil and Dante presented the figure of Ulysses, it is necessary to analyze their respective works in terms of characterization and symbolism. In the Aeneid, of course, Aeneas is a Trojan prince and is the son of Anchises and Venus. His first wife was Creusa by whom he had a son named Ascanius; and his second wife was Lavinia, daughter of Latinus, the king of Italy, by whom he had a posthumous son called Aeneas Sylvius. Aeneas succeeded his father-in-law in the kingdom, and the Romans called Aeneas their founder.

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